Great Dane Rescue

Adopting a Great Dane

Friday, November 25th, 2011

People who want a Great Dane usually search to buy a puppy - this is a common and accepted pattern of thought. The owner will establish a great bonding with the dog that is bought as a puppy, brought home and seen through its growing stages, trained, loved, corrected, cared for. You also learn to understand what it likes and what it does not like - it becomes an integral part of your family.

Can A Great Dane Rescue or Adoption Be A Better Option

There are some things to consider before choosing between buying a puppy and rescuing a Great Dane adult dog. Statistics show that for each Great Dane puppy for sale there are 5-10 adults waiting to be rescued in animal shelters. These giant dogs in their body buildings are in fact just some overgrown puppies in their temperament, and the confinement of the animal shelter will produce them a lot of sufferance, while they will pine for the company of humans. Would you not consider saving one of these unlucky Great Danes instead of buying a puppy from a breeder?

People who decide to adopt an adult dog want also to avoid all the problems and headaches that accompany the growth of a puppy in their house. You should also consider all the uncertainties that accompany the purchase of a puppy. You will wonder whether the puppy’s temperament will be good when it grows up, whether it will be trained properly, whether all the efforts involved is really worth it, when there is a simple alternative - to get an already grown up Great Dane from a rescue home.

Adoption can be considered a readymade alternative of getting a Great Dane dog: you will surely obtain what you have chosen and you will be also able to enjoy all the happiness and pleasure of having a Great Dane without having to go through the trouble of raising a puppy. This could be an excellent solution for people who have limited time on their hands to spend on such a huge task.

Additional Reason to Adopt a Great Dane

- a Great Dane rescue/adoption would make you feel wonderful everytime you look at the giant that curls quietly at your feet; you saved this huge animal’s life and it feels great to know that.

- As a great addition, you should know that this breed of dogs is very sensitive and it will know you have saved its life; this will lead to a special bond between you two and few people have the chance to experience such a relationship.

- the adult dog will almost always be excellently trained and have a very balanced temperament - life can be pretty simple with a Great Dane rescue/adoption.

- you could often get a purebred adult Great Dane from the a Great Dane rescue /adoption centre at one fraction of the cost that would be involved in buying and bringing up a purebred puppy.

These are the most important reasons why you should consider if it is better to buy a Great Dane or to adopt it from an animal rescue shelter. Before you decide to adopt a dog, you need to find out about the top ten Great Dane rescue mistakes that most of the people usually do.

Resource Box

The Great Dane is very gentle with its owner. The Great Dane rescue will cost less than buying a puppy from a breeder. You need to find out about the top ten Great Dane rescue mistakes.

Great Dane Dogs - Why Would You Want One

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

Great Danes are giant dogs and there are some issues that come with this kind of animal. A healthy adult will eat three to five pounds of food a day depending on weight. Vet bills are significantly more for a giant breed than even a large breed dog (although with good diet, there is much less frequency in the need to go to a vet). Great Danes don’t have life spans that match a normal sized dog either - eight years is not uncommon and saying good by is never easy.

And if you do some research it won’t take you long to find a Great Dane Rescue in your area. Too often, people who don’t do research go out and get a Dane because they’re so beautiful but as soon as they realize how big their cute little puppy is getting, or how much food he’s eating, or how important it is to provide dog obedience training, or any number of other things, well, they decide maybe a Dane wasn’t such a good idea and they get rid of them. And of course, in almost all cases there’s absolutely nothing wrong with the dog - just the owners who “saw that doggie in the window” but weren’t prepared to take the responsibility of being a dog owner.

Seems like a lot of issues to deal with if you let a Dane into your life. Why would you? Well, why wouldn’t you? Our Great Danes have enriched our lives and while there have been times when I’ve had to go take ten deep breaths, the joy our Danes have brought into our family can’t even be measured. (And anyway, my teenage kids have made me leave the room to take some deep breaths far more often then our Danes!)

The Great Dane is a unique dog. There just isn’t another breed quite like it in terms of size and look. The description you hear most often is regal, majestic, the Apollo of dogs. I guarantee when you walk with your Great Dane you will be the center of attention. You can’t go down the street or walk into your local dog park without someone saying “Oh my God that is a gorgeous dog-it is a dog isn’t it?” Where we live, drive through coffee outlets are quite popular. When we pull up, the entire staff comes over to the drive thru window to say hi to our Dane.

I noticed about a year ago that my son seemed to be paying a fair bit of attention in making sure our Danes were getting regular walks. Turns out, he was using the dog to impress the girls at school and he was successful! My daughter has also used one of our Great Danes for the same type of thing! No question the cool factor in having a Dane in the family is unique!

Of course, the cool factor shouldn’t be the reason you invite a Dane into your life. It isn’t just that our dogs are big and beautiful and regal. They’re also about the most loyal breed we’ve ever had. Our Danes love every member of the family.

They show affection constantly and although they sometimes forget their own strength, they are very gentle animals. Even so, their bearing, size and deep bark make them pretty good guard animals.
They can be a bit stubborn, but as long as dog obedience training is provided, they are very well behaved. It doesn’t take much effort to groom them and they don’t need a bunch of exercise either - a 25 minute walk every day is enough.

Our Danes are full members of our family and we continue to be amazed at how graceful they are one minute and how ridiculous they look the next (sometimes they’ll forget they’re actually walking and try scratching their bellies while continuing to move forward!) We never get tired of watching them, playing with them, living with them. They are amazing animals and we couldn’t imagine life without them.

Kavar Peter has been owned by Great Danes for over ten years and runs a website devoted to this giant breed of dog. Visit http://www.about-great-danes.com to find out more about life with a Great Dane.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kavar_Peter
http://EzineArticles.com/?Great-Dane-Dogs—Why-Would-You-Want-One&id=2078696

Meet the Breed

Sunday, December 28th, 2008

meet the breed - great dane

alamo great dane club & the san antonio great dane rescue

GREAT DANES GREAT DANES

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Great Dane Puppies of Evaallen Video 5

Sunday, December 28th, 2008

Duration : 0:2:1

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REPOST: Introducing a Kitten to 4 Dogs?

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

So I asked this question last night, and got three answers of “don’t do it”. I understand where these answerers are coming from, and will likely heed their advice and find someone to adopt the kitten, unless someone today has a brilliant answer about introductions.

Here’s last night’s question:

So I’ve adopted a kitten a few days ago. She was found out behind our veterinary hospital and is currently being treated with amoxicillin for some diarrhea. The diarrhea is clearing up marvelously, and she’s thriving and doing well. I’m very excited for her.

Right now, she’s staying in the bathroom upstairs where the dogs can’t get to her. She’ll be staying up there until her diarrhea is completely cleared up. She can’t stay in the bathroom forever, so my question is, how do I go about introducing her to my 4 dogs without freaking anybody out?

A little about the dogs, in order of size:
Ozzy Mae - 8 year old toy rat terror - often gets called “cat” for her cat-like behavior. Has been around cats before. She’ll ignore them if they don’t bother her. Slightly cranky, and will give a warning “snap” if annoyed, but I’ve never seen her actually bite anything or anyone.

Rumpelstilzchen - 12 year old dachshund - He’s a “hunter” and spent the entire 3 years that I owned rats trying to eat them. He’s lived with a cat briefly before and got along with him great, but only after that cat smacked the bejeezus out of him for being too overbearing.

Magi Lou - 4 year old great dane - former great dane rescue “homechecker”. She’d go with us to do home checks for the rescue, and often the homes had cats. She seemed to do very well with other people’s cats, and mostly wanted to play with them. Magi is a total lover and is very curious.

Je’Sus - 4 year old great dane - obnoxious but sweet. Spends a lot of his time barking at the neighbor’s lab. Loves to play and spin in circles until he’s dizzy. Might do OK with a cat once he realizes she’s not a toy.

I won’t say don’t do it, but I will say be very careful.

Especially with four dogs being introduced to one tiny kitten. I would let one of the dogs in the bathroom at a time, you holding the kitten. Let them sniff of her and watch their body language, make sure they don’t get too excited or try to snap at the cat. Give each one some personal time with the cat. It’s a lot easier to get one dog used to it than 4 at once, that may give the kitten a heart attack, hah.

See how those visits go and if you feel comfortable, bring the cat out into the rest of the house and walk around with it for awhile. Sit on the cough, let the dogs come up and sniff of it some more. If you see any defensive body language, I would remove the cat immediately.

Just do it slow and make sure to have the animals under full control. It would suck for one of the dogs to get over excited or their prey drive kick in and the kitten get severely hurt or killed.

Do not set the kitten on the floor either, not right now. Dogs, even gentle ones, try to play with them and end up killing them without meaning to.

Just test it out little by little and see how it goes.

Great Dane Honey - Visit to the Vet!

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

www.bighoneydog.com / Honey the Great Dane and Lemon the moggie have their annual check-up at the vet…
(The Vets, 608 Manukau Rd, Greenwoods Corner, Epsom, Auckland)

Duration : 0:6:28

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Great Dane Honey - Visit to the Vet!

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

www.bighoneydog.com / Honey the Great Dane and Lemon the moggie have their annual check-up at the vet…
(The Vets, 608 Manukau Rd, Greenwoods Corner, Epsom, Auckland)

Duration : 0:6:28

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Does Anyone Know of a Good Company/store That Carries Large Patio Pet Doors? Bigger Than 12"x24" for the Flap.

Friday, December 19th, 2008

My family has two dalmatians and one great dane and we just rescued a new great dane. Unfortunately he is too big to fit through our current dog door! I'm trying to find a patio insert door that has a bigger opening than 12"x24". So far I have only seen wall doors of bigger size and one patio insert for a ridiculous $900. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Do a search on google for patio doggy doors and go from there. Good Luck

Barley on a Great Dane Playdate

Friday, December 19th, 2008

December 14, 2008 ~ Barley the Portuguese Water Dog (7 months old) romping with Aiden and Hale, five month old Great Dane puppies!

Duration : 0:1:48

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Barley on a Great Dane Playdate

Friday, December 19th, 2008

December 14, 2008 ~ Barley the Portuguese Water Dog (7 months old) romping with Aiden and Hale, five month old Great Dane puppies!

Duration : 0:1:48

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