Are Great Dane Puppies Hard to Housebreak? She Is 8 Weeks Old and We Get Her This Weekend. Just Wondering.?


If you bring your dog home by car take someone with you who will do the driving and let him lie on your lap, (the puppy not the driver)this will help him to recognise you as his best friend. Do not let him into the house until he has been into the yard/garden and when you put him down he will probably urinate. If he does, use a phrase like “get one” and use this phrase every time he urinates. Eventually he will pee on command. After he has a pee let him wander around your yard/garden, if it’s not fenced keep him on a lead. After this take him into the house.
Dog get separation anxiety if they are left alone. Hopefully you realise that you cannot leave your puppy all day, some dog get very stressed if they are left alone for just a short time. You cannot take them shopping or to the dentists, consequently YOU MUST TRAIN THEM TO BE CONFIDENT WHEN THEY ARE LEFT AND PREVENT SEPARATION ANXIETY.
Puppies need a lot of sleep and he will be tired after sniffing around the garden, he will need to rest and sleep in peace. Try the following to ensure that he does not suffer from separation anxiety and does not miss his mum and his litter mates.
Put your dog in a separate room if possible, then go out of this room and close the door. Open the door immediately and go into the room again, ignore your dog whilst pretending to clean the counter tops or pretend to do something else for a very short time. Go out of the room and immediately go back in again, keep doing this and gradually increase the amount of time which you stay on the other side of the door.
Timing is vital and you must get back into the room BEFORE YOUR PUPPY CRIES. Eventually your puppy will go to sleep and will be convinced that you are just on the other side of the door. When you know that he is asleep stop going into the room, however you MUST LISTEN FOR HIM WAKING UP.

When you know that he is awake, go into the room lift him up and CARRY HIM into the garden for a pee and whilst he is doing this say “get one” and praise him profusely. Puppies need feeding about four times a day, although he may have a pee before his feed you should also take him out again afterwards. You must always take him out when it wakes up and after he has had food or drink. It’s also a good idea to let him explore your yard/garden afterwards and play with him.

It is vital that you continue with the door thing for the first few days. To ensure that you have a happy puppy, try to devote all of your time to him for the first two weeks. This will also help with potty training, however he will not have any control for the first few months and he will pee during the night… To help him, use newspaper that you have rubbed in one of the pees that he has done outside and leave several layers of newspaper on the floor. Hopefully he will toilet on the newspaper during the night.
You should also encourage visitors as this will help with his socialisation. Later when you able to take him out, walk around supermarkets where there are lots of people. Stand at the school gates and watch the children coming out and you MUST take him to puppy classes to get used to other dogs.

GOOD LUCK.

Good Luck

7 Responses to “Are Great Dane Puppies Hard to Housebreak? She Is 8 Weeks Old and We Get Her This Weekend. Just Wondering.?”

  1. ajmommy002 says:

    I had a litter around Thanksgiving. I don't think they are any harder than other dogs they just make a bigger mess when they are learning. I had 9 of the crate trained by 8 weeks old. Just be consistent.
    References :

  2. valeriedanes says:

    No. In fact they are one of the easiest to train.
    She should be somewhat housebroken already if you're getting her from a good (responsible) breeder.

    Are you planning on crating?
    Will you be home during the day with the pup?
    Do you have a doggie door?
    All of these things can make housebreaking a whiz -pun intended. *G*
    References :

  3. dorothy s says:

    If you bring your dog home by car take someone with you who will do the driving and let him lie on your lap, (the puppy not the driver)this will help him to recognise you as his best friend. Do not let him into the house until he has been into the yard/garden and when you put him down he will probably urinate. If he does, use a phrase like “get one” and use this phrase every time he urinates. Eventually he will pee on command. After he has a pee let him wander around your yard/garden, if it’s not fenced keep him on a lead. After this take him into the house.
    Dog get separation anxiety if they are left alone. Hopefully you realise that you cannot leave your puppy all day, some dog get very stressed if they are left alone for just a short time. You cannot take them shopping or to the dentists, consequently YOU MUST TRAIN THEM TO BE CONFIDENT WHEN THEY ARE LEFT AND PREVENT SEPARATION ANXIETY.
    Puppies need a lot of sleep and he will be tired after sniffing around the garden, he will need to rest and sleep in peace. Try the following to ensure that he does not suffer from separation anxiety and does not miss his mum and his litter mates.
    Put your dog in a separate room if possible, then go out of this room and close the door. Open the door immediately and go into the room again, ignore your dog whilst pretending to clean the counter tops or pretend to do something else for a very short time. Go out of the room and immediately go back in again, keep doing this and gradually increase the amount of time which you stay on the other side of the door.
    Timing is vital and you must get back into the room BEFORE YOUR PUPPY CRIES. Eventually your puppy will go to sleep and will be convinced that you are just on the other side of the door. When you know that he is asleep stop going into the room, however you MUST LISTEN FOR HIM WAKING UP.

    When you know that he is awake, go into the room lift him up and CARRY HIM into the garden for a pee and whilst he is doing this say “get one” and praise him profusely. Puppies need feeding about four times a day, although he may have a pee before his feed you should also take him out again afterwards. You must always take him out when it wakes up and after he has had food or drink. It’s also a good idea to let him explore your yard/garden afterwards and play with him.

    It is vital that you continue with the door thing for the first few days. To ensure that you have a happy puppy, try to devote all of your time to him for the first two weeks. This will also help with potty training, however he will not have any control for the first few months and he will pee during the night… To help him, use newspaper that you have rubbed in one of the pees that he has done outside and leave several layers of newspaper on the floor. Hopefully he will toilet on the newspaper during the night.
    You should also encourage visitors as this will help with his socialisation. Later when you able to take him out, walk around supermarkets where there are lots of people. Stand at the school gates and watch the children coming out and you MUST take him to puppy classes to get used to other dogs.

    GOOD LUCK.

    Good Luck
    References :
    Dorothy S

  4. soli808302 says:

    Dane puppies, especially if kept very clean from birth on are easy to housebreak. I often have a litter pretty much housebroken by 7-8 weeks of age. A diligent breeder can do a lot to help the housebreaking processes prior to the puppy going into their new home. Below is a housebreaking handout I have my purchasers.

    Dane puppies are generally very clean animals and easy to house-break, provided you follow a few important
    rules. If you are diligent and follow a structured schedule, housebreaking should be a breeze.
    Once in awhile, a puppy will have problems controlling their bladder. If the puppy is a female, the
    possibility of a bladder infection should be checked out. Also, some puppies have an intolerance for Vitamin
    C and/or MSM. To find out if these supplements are causing a problem, try removing them from the diet
    for a couple of days and see what happens.

    Housebreaking a puppy doesn’t have to be a horrifying experience. If you remember a few things about canines
    and commit yourself to a schedule and consistency, the process will go very smoothly.
    First, dogs are den animals. They have, in nature, a home. If you watch young puppies, you will find, if given a
    choice, they will readily go and sleep in an enclosed area. You might note that your puppy has a tendency to sleep
    under or beside something; following his instincts to have a den.
    In the wild, dens are to be kept clean. As soon as the puppy is able to learn, his mother teaches him to eliminate
    outside of the den area. If you observe young puppies while they are still in the whelping box you will note they
    attempt to leave the sleeping area to eliminate as soon as they can walk. Also, if the breeder has kept the puppy
    area very clean, the puppy will be easier to housebreak.
    We can imitate nature by proving your dog with his own den. In this case-a crate. The puppy owner can choose
    between wire and plastic;’ plastic is easier to clean in the even of a messy accident and is the preferred choice for
    young puppies. (Once a Dane is housebroken, a larger wire crate can be used.)
    When you start housebreaking, you must use a crate that is large enough to just fit the puppy. He should have
    enough room to stand up, turn around, and lie down in comfortably-but no more! Remember, the idea is for the
    puppy to keep his den clean. If the area is too large, he simply will get up, walk a little distance from his sleeping
    area, and eliminate. By keeping the area small he will be unable to find a corner in which to eliminate. Your
    young puppy is coming to you with an open mind. It is up to you, with consistency, repetition, praise, patience,
    and kindness, to help him develop into a dog of which you can be proud. A simple rule that must be followed is
    when the pup is left unattended, he must be restricted to his crate. In other words, the puppy is never left
    unsupervised. He’s either in his crate, outside in a fenced area, or under your direct supervision.
    Common sense tells you to take the puppy outside after he eats, drinks, or awakes from a not. Remember, after he
    has eliminated outside praise him!
    Restrict your puppy to his crate at bedtime or when you are away from home for several hours. As long as he is
    old enough and has control, he will wait to relieve himself until given the opportunity to go outside. Remember,
    be fair-he is only a puppy!
    Furnish the crate simply. Use a rug, crate mate, old blanket or towels to provide him with a comfortable;e area.
    Make sure the entire area is covered. This will convey the idea that no pat of the area should be used as a
    washroom.
    The crate is his home. Favorite toys should always be returned to the crate when playtime is over.
    The crate wills serve as his home for his lifetime. He will feel comfortable and secure in it. It will be an asset when
    traveling or restricting his activity when non-doggy friends or relatives come to visit. The crate can also be used
    to house the dog when you just don’t want him underfoot. If you have young children, you can teach them the
    crate is “off limits”. The puppy will soon learn he can go to his crate when he has had enough of the kids!
    A crate is a helpful investment that will be worth its weight in gold. Use the following schedule to assist in a
    step—by-step account of how to housebreak your puppy.
    1.Bedtime-take the puppy outside and give him ample time to eliminate. Take him to a spot where he has
    eliminated previously; this will help him get the idea. If you have a fenced area, let him loose. If on leash, be
    sure not to choke him. Use either a buckle collar or a training collar on the inactive ring. Using a command
    is helpful.
    2.When he eliminates, praise him. Let him know how good he was for doing his business outside.
    3.Keep praising and take him inside and put him in his crate for bedtime.
    4.Morning-the very first thing-pick him up (don’t expect a young puppy to walk outside without stopping to
    pee!) and take him outside. He’s tried to be clean all night, so you hurry to get him outside, and he will do his
    business in a rush. Now, bring him in and give him his freedom in a confined area like the kitchen with the
    door blocked as long as you are going to be with the pup. Remember-always supervised! Baby gates work
    well for this.
    5.Feed-after you have done your first morning chores and after your briefest, feed him his food. He’s had his
    freedom up until this point, but after he eats, take him outside or put him in the yard.
    6.After you have seen him eliminate, bring him inside and put him in his crate.
    7.At lunch time take him out of the crate and put him in the yard.
    8.Bring him in after he eliminates and give him confined freedom with you for one or two hours-then take him
    outside for a “quickie”. Now, put him back in the crate until late afternoon.
    9.At dinner time, take him outside from the crate for another “quickie”. Bring him in for confined freedom
    while you prepare your dinner and his. After you eat, feed the pup, then take him outside just as soon as he
    finishes. Naturally, you can feed him before you eat, provided you have the time to follow the “exercise”
    procedure. Do not feed later than 6:00 p.m.!
    10.After dinner, allow him controlled, confined freedom until about 8:00 p.m., then out for another quickie.
    11.Before you retire for the night, go through the bedtime (#1) routine.

    If you keep this routine for at least two weeks-diligently!-of preventing him from doing toilet duties in the house,
    showing him how to be right and praising for correct actions-the pattern should be set. You can now start to check
    on his learning by allowing a little more freedom from his crate. Incidentally, when the puppy is out of the crate,
    the door is always left open in the event he wants to go in. The extended freedom is still only in the confined
    area-just in the morning; so, if he’s “good”, the next day try the afternoon. Do not test your puppy all night after
    only two weeks! After a few more weeks, if the pup is good, then confine him to his crate only at night and when
    you leave the house. Then, test whenever you please!

    Once you are confident of his progress, start limited introduction to the other room, but only when you are with
    the puppy and when your attention can be on him. It won’t hurt to have him on a leash while you watch TV.
    Important-during these lessons of freedom, be sensitive to any whining or attempts to go to the door; to any loss of
    interest in you or a toy; to any circling-get the puppy outside immediately!
    References :
    Daynakin Great Danes

  5. lotsadogs says:

    I got my 8 week dane pup in July. The breeder had him paper-trained at that time. I put papers down for him when we got home, and he used them a few times, but I made sure to take him out right after he woke up from a nap, or ate, or played (like within 30 seconds or he wouldn't be able to wait and would posture to go).

    He never had an accident in his crate. By 10 weeks he was done with the paper. The entire time I've had him, he had 1 accident in the house, and that was my fault for getting distracted while he was eating.

    Make sure you feed her a good food like Eagle Pack, Canidea, or Chicken Soup. Do not feed her ANY kind of puppy food, even large breed. Nothing you can get in a grocery store or at Walmart is a good food. That includes Science Diet, Eukanuba, etc.

    Have fun!!!
    References :

  6. steve says:

    i made her a place in the back yard that i call the BOX , at 11 weeks old when i let her out i just tell her “THE BOX” and she goes there every time . The BOX is about 3ft x 10ft and has 1/4 inch gravel 3in thick. it makes things easier when you have to pick up,and makes walking in the yard esier to.only one place to pick up.be consistant and don’t discourage yourself.

  7. Lola says:

    How long should a Great Dane be expected to hold his bladder? (If people are gone during the day)

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