Great Dane Home | Great Dane Manual | Obedience Training | Supplies | Blog | Picture Gallery | Tell A Friend |
MAIN MENU
About The Great Dane
Great Dane Breeders
Great Dane Puppies
Great Dane Care
Great Dane Training
Great Dane Rescue
Great Dane Types
Great Dane Pictures
FREE Stuff
Great Dane BOOKS
Most Popular Books
Great Dane Manual
Obedience Training
Dog Food Secrets
Dog Food Recipes
Health Care Remedies
Great Dane STORE
Supplies & Accessories
RELATED ARTICLES

Outdoor Dog Beds

Obedience training Benefits

Dog Kennel

Outdoor Dog Kennel

Extra Large Dog Kennel

Veterinary Advice

Hunting Dog Collar

Innotek Dog Training Collar

Dog Collars

Make Your Own Dog Food

Natural Balance Dog Food

LATEST NEWS
  • Know Etiquette For Visiting The Dog Park (Honolulu Advertiser)

  • NJ Woman Drowns Trying To Rescue Grandson's Dog (1010 WINS New York)

  • Choosing A Dog Trainer

  • Crews Rescue Dog From Frozen Lake (BBC News)

  • How To Interpret Your Dogs Behavior

  • Why Dog Training Fails For Some People

  • Fear Aggression In Your Dog

  • Woman Drowns Retrieving Dog From Frozen Pond (The Charlotte Observer)

  •    Home » Articles » DogTraining » Having A Few Problems With Your Great Dane?

    Having A Few Problems With Your Great Dane?

     

    Owning a Great Dane is not always easy. Sometimes they do play up, and display some behavioral problems. Here are a few more to consider.

    News Flash  Jan, 06 2009

    Living With Two Dogs

    It's quite common for dog owners to consider adding a second dog to their family.... Read More

     

    News Flash  Jan, 06 2009

    Buying More Than One Puppy - Should You

    When a prospective pet owner searches for the puppy of their dreams, it is quite... Read More

     

    News Flash  Jan, 06 2009

    The RIGHT Way To Inspect Your Dog For Fleas

    One of the most common health risks that face our pets are only about the size of... Read More

     

    News Flash  Jan, 06 2009

    Woman Drowns Retrieving Dog From Frozen Pond (AP Via Yahoo! News)

    New Jersey authorities say a woman drowned trying to retrieve her grandson's dog from a frozen pond. Read More

     

    News Flash  Jan, 06 2009

    Obedience Training For Your Dog

    Unfortunately there are so many dogs out there that has missed out on the essential... Read More

     

    Bark for no apparent reason:

    True, all dogs bark and thatís natural but itís equally true that domesticated pets bark chiefly because they are lonely, bored, distressed, afraid, when seeking attention or defending their territory. Instead of putting him through this gamut of emotions, give your pet enough love and feeling of security to feel confident and wanted, feed him well and give him enough exercise before you leave home for the day, setting aside a bowl of fresh water through the day. Show him a particular spot of his private area where he can put his toys and play with them too. Take care to see that you give him a room set at a comfortable temperature and well ventilated. If you return home after sunset, arrange for a light to come on once it gets dark. And yes, if your dog is a radio or TV buff, leave either on low so he remains entertained. In all the time you train him, make sure he learns when to bark. Alternatively, you could get him a collar that sprays citrus mist under the dogís nose whenever he begins to bark.

    Chew your belongings:

    If you think your dogís chewing things far too much, then, refrain from assuming itís abnormal behavior. For, chewing is not just a sign of curiosity among dogs but is normal teething too. Find out just why he chews so much. Then, dog- proof your home, put trash out of reach by using containers with tight-fitting lids. Also, encourage your kids not to strew their clothes, socks, shoes and books all over the house. Despite this, if you still catch your dog chewing, make such a loud sound that he stops it immediately. Then, interrupt him with a loud noise and give him a chewy toy. Praise him lavishly when he begins to chew his toy. You could also fill his chew toy with treats.

    Dig holes:

    This too, is normal behavior for your pet. Youíll find him digging out of curiosity, for entertainment, when he needs to bury his bones, when seeking prey, comfort, protection, attention or escape. Though this could well be part of his routine, you could slowly eliminate it out of his habits by reserving an area just for him to dig in. If heís clever, he will soon realize that you donít like him digging except in his area. Clean your yard so that it is not infested with rodents, rats, rabbits or wild cats that are sure to heighten his habit and need for hunting and digging. If you increase the time you spend with him, it will give him sufficient mental and physical exercise. Involve him playing fetch ball, Frisbee games, agility and obedience training or trick training.

    Fight with other animals, including strays:

     More often than not, well-trained dogs do not get into street fights with other dogs. But, on the off-chance that you sense a fight due to begin any moment, ask your dog to heel or sit and stay until his ďopponentĒ is well and truly out of your way. No matter what happensóeven if a fight actually breaks outódonít shout at the dogs because that only encourages them to continue. But if you catch sight of a water body or a hose, spray water on them, but avoid their eyes and heads. If you water their feet, it will immediately end the fight, but should this not work, you and the owner of the opponent dog should each grab your pets not by the collar but by the tail. This serves to pull the hind legs off the ground and startles them into quickly ending the fight. If your dog is the aggressor, pull him away first. Once they are both calm, tell your dog that this behavior is just not on.

    Chase everything and everyone that moves:

    You really canít completely get rid of this problem, as it is an inborn trait. So, until he learns how to behave himself and obey your commands, he will have to be limited to the house or fenced yard outside your house. When your pet sees a moving object, he thinks itís a sheep or lamb and immediately wants to stop it. So, in this case, the challenge for you is to undo an inborn instinct.

    Bite despite lack of provocation:

    Whenever you play, make a noise or move a bit too fast for him, your pet tends to get excited and he decides to tackle the problem with his claws and teeth. If, on the other hand, he is sick and you happen to touch him on a wound, he will immediately snap back as this his only line of defense. So also in anger and fearóif you find his ears laid back against his head, legs gone stiff and the coat on his back standing stiffly, or if emits low and frightening growls, it means he is out to take the best care of himself by protecting himself as best as he can. To allay his fears, you should freeze, count to five slowly, then move away slowly to indicate that you are not his enemy. What you shouldnít do is to stare back at him in defiance as you are saying silently to him, ďI challenge you to bite me. Go on, show me you can do it.Ē Also, donít run, jump or wave your hands around, as it will excite him more. Donít scream either and certainly donít throw stones and sticks at him. Ask your vet or trainer to tell you exactly how to handle such situations. Perhaps you could also use a muzzle so that he doesnít bite anyone, including you.

     

    Got Dog Problems? The GOOD news for YOU is that it's easier than you may think to regain control of your Great Dane. Discover all the latest PROVEN methods and techniques YOU can use to train your Great Dane. Find out about Great Dane Obedience Training NOW!

    Great Dane Picture

    Great Dane Picture

    Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use | Contact Us | Great Dane Blog | Great Dane Pictures | Tell A Friend |

    Latest Great Dane NewsCopyright © 2008 www.OfficialGreatDaneGuide.com All Rights Reserved.